“Walk (it) off”: phrasal verb meaning.

Walk (it) off
An expression used when you have eaten a lot, you feel full and you need to burn those calories, so you go for a long walk. It helps you feel fitter, get rid of the extra calories you’ve just eaten and feel better about yourself and you don’t have to feel guilty for eating too much.

“Walk (it) off”: use in context explanation

The man with his wife have just had a big meal. They’ve eaten a lot of carbohydrates and indulged in a large ice cream and sweets. What’s more, the husband also had a few glasses of red wine. He feels really full now. He admits he’s eaten too much and he feels bad about it, because he should be on a healthy diet. The idea of getting weight is bothering him so much that he feels an urge to walk it all off immediately. His wife can see him leaving the house in a rush and she starts giggling. Her husband has forgotten to put on his trousers.

Other examples of “Walk (it) off” phrasal verb in a sentence

  • I want to walk off 5 kilos in 2 months, it’s my goal.
  • You go by car, I have to walk off the pizza.
  • I feel so full, I have to walk it off.

You go by car, I have to walk off the pizza.

I feel so full, I have to walk it off.